LeaDuck

leaDuck

今日では、多くの玩具が市場に発表され、中でもラジオコントロールカーなどの操作可能な玩具は技術の進歩と 共に性能が向上しています。最近ではスマートフォンのアプリケーションで操作可能な玩具も発表されている一方で、それらは子供や幼児にとっては操作が困難な場合がしばしばあります。そこで我々は音を利用した自走式玩具の簡易な操作方法を提案します.具体的にはユーザがベルを鳴らすと、アヒルの形をした玩具がユーザがいる方向に向かって走行します。このアヒル型の玩具は2つのマイクを搭載しており、それを用いて音源がある方向を推定します。また、周波数解析を行って音程も推定し、設定した周波数であれば走行します。ユーザの後ろを玩具が追走することで、アヒルの親子のようにユーザは玩具を操作して遊ぶことが出来ます。

 

Today, there are many types of digital toys available for children. Actuated toys, such as remote-controlled cars, are getting more intelligent and smart: we can now control these kinds of toys with smartphone applications. On the other hand, such controllers are sometimes difficult for children to control. Thus we propose an easy way to control a motorized car by using simple sounds. Once a user rings a bell, it makes a duck toy move towards the direction of a user. Our duck toy has two capacitor condenser microphones to detect the location of a sound source. Then, through frequency analysis, it detects the pitch of a sound. As a result, a user can enjoy being like a mother duck.


Paper

  • Nagisa Niwata, Tetsuaki BABA, A Sound-Controlled Duck Toy: a Challenge to Apply Sound Source to Controller for Children’s toys, ID:198, Art Paper, 12th International Conference for Asia Digital Art and Design,15-16 November, 2014 [PDF]

hazards.jp

Paul is currently working on a research project here at Tokyo Metropolitan University’s System Design faculty looking at how to make information on natural hazards (such as earthquakes, active volcanoes and typhoons) in Japan more accessible and usable. It’s very early stages but the plan is to build a smart phone app. We’ve recently launched a mini-site for the project at hazards.jp. This research will build on some of the findings from Paul’s PhD and the MyFireWatch project.